Tag Archives: menu

3 Months of Fall Meals: My Menu Plan

Well, I did some revising of my own menu plan for fall as I wrote about my menu planning process, and so I thought I would share the result with you all: 3 weeks of very family friendly, not too time consuming meals.  Each recipe makes about 5 servings: one each for me and my husband for dinner and lunch the next day, plus a half serving each for the kids. (Ender still doesn’t really count. :D) Anyway, if you’re interested in not having to plan dinner for the next three weeks, here you go! Shopping lists are included in the menu file, but don’t include basics like chicken, rice, flour, etc., so you may want to check that your idea of kitchen staples matches mine. :D

Fall 3 Week Rotation Menu

Fall Recipes for 3 Weeks

Week 1:

Friday – Canadian Bacon Pizza, salad, cheesy bread
Saturday – leftovers/eat out
Sunday – Salmon, rice, veggie
Monday – Chicken Squash Corn Chowder (in the crock pot), baguettes
Tuesday – Mongolian Beef, rice
Wednesday – Bucatini Al’Amatriciana, veggie
Thursday – Oven Fajitas

Week 2:

Friday – Canadian Bacon & Apple Pizza, salad, cheesy bread
Saturday – leftovers/eat out
Sunday – Calzones (no recipe for this one, as the instructions are a little complex to rewrite; the recipe is found in Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, which every cook should own!)
Monday – Autumn Minestrone Soup (in the crock pot), baguettes
Tuesday – Almond Chicken Stirfry, rice
Wednesday – Tuscan Garlic Chicken, veggie
Thursday – Tostadas, corn, salsa & chips

Week 3:

Friday – Philly Steak Pizza, salad, cheesy bread
Saturday – leftovers/eat out
Sunday – Chicken Enchiladas, salad
Monday – Cheesy Vegetable Chowder (in the crock pot), baguettes
Tuesday – Beef and Cashew Stirfry, rice
Wednesday – Paprika Chicken Stroganoff, veggie
Thursday – Black Bean Soup, rice, salad

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Filed under Cooking & Meal Prep, Feeding, Spreadsheet Wednesday

How to Plan Meals for Three Months in Three Hours: Hour Three

So at the end of hour two, you should have your meal plan completed, and you could be finished. However, I have found that taking the process one step further makes a big difference. During hour three, you gather all the materials you need to make actually preparing your meals easier, namely recipes and shopping lists.

Hour Three: Creating a Seasonal Recipe Book

If a lot of your recipes come from online sources, it’s simple and quick to create a recipe book of all your meals for the season. Even if they come from traditional cook books that you keep handy, I suggest copying all the recipes for the season into one place. That way when dinner comes around, you can simply pull it out and go. I even keep a bookmark in mine so I know exactly where I am. Every second counts, right? (Only if you are obsessive like me. :D ) Plus if your recipes are all in one place, your husband can even pull off dinner if you’re sick. I can’t tell you how many times I had to scrounge through pinterest half delirious with cold medicine before I figured this out.

Here’s how to create a personalized recipe book as quickly as possible:

  1. Buy your materials – I like to use a 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 binder, because it’s more compact than the traditional full page binder size and therefore takes less counter space. It’s really easy to scale your recipes to print on half a page (more on that in a minute). Grab some half size page protectors, and maybe some tabs and you’re ready to go. You’ll also need a word processing program and a printer that’s not running out of ink. :D
  2. Create a title page and table of contents (Optional) – Open up a new document in your favorite word processing program. Type “Fall Recipes” (or whatever clever title you come up with) on the first page and maybe throw a cute piece of clip art in there. On the next page, add a table of contents. Most word processing programs can auto-generate one. In the most current version of Word, it’s under References >> Table of Contents. As long as you put the title of each recipe in the “Header 1” style, it will automatically add it to your table on contents. Now’s a good time to make sure your document has page numbers too.
  3. Gather your recipes – Run through your menu and type each recipe onto a new page of the document. Copy and paste from the internet, type it out of your cookbook, or even take a picture–if your camera is high enough resolution that you can read the recipe. You can be as lazy or as fussy as you want with formatting, but the point is to get them in one place and in the order you are going to make them. Make sure to choose a heading format for the title if you want your table on contents to auto-generate.
  4. Size up the fonts and print 2-to-a-page – This last step is the real trick: make sure each recipe fills as much of the page as possible. Size up the font on each page until the page is just filled, but not flowing over to the next page. Then make sure your table of contents is up to date–you may need to hit a refresh option to see all the recipes. Then print your recipe book, but select the option to print 2 pages on every page. (Trust me, it’s in there somewhere.) Ta Da! Your recipes now take half a page each.
  5. Fold in half, put in page protectors, and start cooking – Yup, if you fold the page in half, it fits perfectly in a half size page protector. Congrats on making your own cook book.

Hour Three: Pre-Writing Your Shopping Lists

Ah, but there’s one more quick trick. Now that you have all your recipes in a binder, you can easily pre-write your shopping list. Pre-writing your list means that it takes a lot less time to write your list each week, which means you can be out the door faster!

For each meal, write the ingredients in the shopping list column of the meal plan sheet. Leave out any pantry staples that you always have on hand (like flour, salt, and milk); list just the specialty ingredients. I leave off chicken and ground beef, and common vegetables too, since I always have those on hand. Use your judgement as to what to put on.

And that’s it. I’m currently going through the process of revamping my fall meal plan. Anyone interested in seeing my step-by-step?

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Filed under Cooking & Meal Prep, Spreadsheet Wednesday

Spreadsheet Wednesday: Pantry List

Click to view and download a copy

So this will be a quick one, but it goes well with last week’s Spreadsheet Wednesday: my pantry list.   This is another one I keep laminated (or sheet-protector-ed) on the fridge.

The list itself is self-explanatory.  These are the ingredients I keep on hand for various recipes.  I don’t list these ingredients on my menu plan, since I assume I have them already.  The first two columns are the most used, along with the paper products section.

I use a dry erase marker to circle items as a run out during the week.  Then, as I prepare for a shopping trip, I quickly go through at least the first two columns to check for things that haven’t run out yet, but probably will before the next trip.  That way, I don’t forget the eggs. Or the onions.  It’s surprisingly devastating to run out of onions.

I’m thinking of switching to a system where I print out a new one of these every week and use a highlighter to mark items.  Then I can just take it to the store with me instead of writing out the list separately.

Do you keep a pantry list?  How do you keep from forgetting the eggs?

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Filed under Cooking & Meal Prep, Spreadsheet Wednesday